plastic pollution

Plastic Pollution - Why Coca-Cola need to take responsibility too

Posted by Louisa Casson — 13 April 2017 at 12:28pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

One of the best things about working on Greenpeace’s campaign to end ocean plastics is the chance to have lots of conversations with all sorts of people about the issue - whether on local radio stations or with pedestrians walking past the 2.5 tonne sculpture we installed outside Coca-Cola’s London HQ this week.

2.5 tonne ocean plastic sculpture installed on doorstep of Coca-Cola HQ

Last edited 10 April 2017 at 10:27am

Monday 10th April, 2017. London - This morning Greenpeace activists have installed a 2.5 tonne ocean plastic sculpture on the doorstep of Coca-Cola’s London HQ, in protest at the company’s role in ocean plastic pollution.

The artwork, Plasticide, was created by renowned underwater sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor and features seabirds regurgitating plastic amidst a family beach picnic. Up to 12.7 million tonnes of plastic enters the sea every year, and plastic bottles and bottle tops form a major source of the plastic packaging found washed up on the world’s shorelines. But major companies like Coca-Cola are failing to take meaningful action.

5 Reasons Why We're Outside Coca-Cola's HQ

Posted by Louisa Casson — 9 April 2017 at 7:48pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

This morning, we've installed a piece of art right to the doorstep of Coca-Cola’s European office, to hold the soft drinks giant accountable for ocean plastic pollution. 

What soft drink companies are saying

Posted by Louisa Casson — 7 April 2017 at 10:35am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose / Greenpeace

It’s been three weeks since Greenpeace launched our expose on the gigantic plastic footprint of the soft drinks industry - and their lacklustre action to protect our oceans from the blight of throwaway plastic bottles. 

Do the manifestos commit to end ocean plastics?

Posted by Louisa Casson — 22 May 2017 at 10:50am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Kajsa Sjolander / Greenpeace

No matter which party possible MPs belong to, or which constituency they are campaigning to represent, they all have a responsibility to help end ocean plastics.

An uninhabited island deep in the South Pacific falls prey to a plague - of plastic.

Posted by Louisa Casson — 16 May 2017 at 12:42pm - Comments
by-nc. Credit: Jennifer Lavers / The Guardian
One of many hundreds of crabs that now make their homes out of plastic debris washed up on Henderson Island. Photograph: Jennifer Lavers / The Guardian

It's a horror story.<--break->

Bon Voyage! The Beluga II Sets Sail!

Posted by TishaBrown — 12 May 2017 at 9:50am - Comments


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Ocean plastic crisis

Iconic seabird colony polluted with ocean plastic, Greenpeace expedition finds

Last edited 11 May 2017 at 12:29pm
11 May, 2017

A research expedition by the crew of Greenpeace’s ship the Beluga II has revealed high levels of plastic pollution on the iconic Bass Rock in the Firth of Forth, home to the world’s largest colony of Northern gannets.

With studies showing that 90% of seabirds have ingested plastic, these shocking images reveal plastic around eggs in nests and strewn across the island, and even in the beaks of seabirds.

The findings come on the first day of research during the Beluga II’s scientific voyage around Scotland, which runs until the end of June, documenting the impact of plastic pollution on some of the UK’s most precious wildlife like puffins, gannets and basking sharks. 

Greenpeace ship sets sail on ocean plastic expedition around Scotland

Last edited 5 May 2017 at 10:57am
5 May, 2017

Edinburgh, 5 May 2017 – Today, Greenpeace’s ship the Beluga II sets sail on a two-month scientific voyage around Scotland’s coastlines, investigating the impact of ocean plastic pollution on some of the UK’s most beautiful landscapes and iconic wildlife.

With studies showing that 90% of seabirds have ingested plastic, scientists and campaigners aboard the vessel will explore the front line of plastic pollution, from gannets and razorbills on the Bass Rock, to basking sharks in the Hebrides and seabird colonies on the Shiant Isles.

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