Blog: Oceans

Taking Action on Tuna

Posted by Hélène Bourges — 27 June 2016 at 3:04pm - Comments

Right now, only two per cent of John West tuna is sustainably caught. The rest is sourced from suppliers who use indiscriminate 'fish aggregation devices' (FADs), which see turtles and sharks killed as bycatch. What's happening out at sea – and being sold in our shops – is having a devastating toll on the marine environment. This is why all of us are so determined to transform the tuna industry.


The Good Scrub Guide and other simple ways to beat the microbead

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 27 June 2016 at 2:22pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Credit Olivia Bailey-FFI

Guest blog by Daniel Steadman of Fauna & Flora International<--break-><--break-><--break->

In Pictures: Celebrate, it's #SharkWeek!

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 24 June 2016 at 5:11pm - Comments

Every year the Discovery Channel dedicates a week to these amazing carnivorous fish. What a great opportunity to share a few of our archive pictures showing what magnificent creatures sharks are and highlighting the threats they face.<--break->

Microbeads - the story so far….

Posted by Elisabeth Whitebread — 21 June 2016 at 5:17pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Fred Dott/Greenpeace
Microbeads on a fingertip illustrating just how tiny they are

Last Wednesday on World Oceans Day we handed our microbeads petition into Number 10. Over 300,000 of you signed the petition - one of the biggest petitions in Greenpeace UK’s history! This is the story of the campaign so far.

Orange roughy – a ‘sustainable’ fish certification too far.

Posted by Willie — 21 June 2016 at 2:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Lizzie Barber / Greenpeace
orange roughy illustration

Orange roughy are easy to over fish. So, humans do. But that doesn't seem to be stopping moves to re-define them as 'sustainable' by the Marine Stewardship Council.

True, when we started fishing orange roughy we didn’t know that this slow-growing, long-lived, deep water fish was particularly susceptible. But now we definitely do. Orange roughy can live to a staggering 150 years old, and are at least 30 years old before they are mature enough to breed. To put that into context: there are probably orange roughy alive today that were born when Queen Victoria was on the throne, and they take about 10 times longer to mature than Atlantic cod.

Can the Cosmetics Industry help win a microbead ban?

Posted by FariahSyed — 13 June 2016 at 11:34am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Fred Dott/ Greenpeace

 

On World Oceans Day, while we handed in our BanTheBead petition, I took a trip down to Parliament to attend the Environmental Audit Committee’s (EAC) inquiry into the environmental impact of microplastics. The EAC is a group of MPs from all parties who come together to review and attempt to resolve environmental issues such as climate change, flooding and air quality and last Wednesday, they looked at microplastics.<--break->

 

Taking Microbeads straight to No10!

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 9 June 2016 at 2:27pm - Comments
312,239 signatures on the microbeads petition
All rights reserved. Credit: David Mirzoeff / Greenpeace

Yesterday, on a rainy summer’s day we took the petition urging David Cameron to ban microbeads to Number 10 Downing Street, complete with 312,239 of YOUR signatures!<--break->

Baby fish are hooked on plastic junk food

Posted by alice.hunter — 3 June 2016 at 11:15am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Oona Lönnstedt
Perch larvae that has ingested microplastic particles

Today brought yet more evidence that putting plastic in the ocean is probably not the best idea humankind has ever had.

Fishing for plankton is ridiculous.

Posted by Willie — 1 June 2016 at 5:04pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: http://spongebob.wikia.com/wiki/Sheldon_J._Plankton/gallery
Plankton is justifiably outraged.

In the ocean, plankton is food.

There are two types of plankton – tiny plants (phytoplankton) and tiny animals (zooplankton).

Zooplankton includes some eggs and larvae of things like fish and crabs, as well as some minute animals that feed on phytoplankton. That makes them the first link in any food chain, and the basis for all of the ocean’s food webs.

Taking 400,000 people on a trip to the Indian Ocean

Posted by Tom Lowe — 1 June 2016 at 3:18pm - Comments
Greenpeace activists confront supply vessel Explorer II
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose/ Greenpeace
Greenpeace activists confront supply vessel Explorer II by blacking out their lights with eco-paint

If John West’s owner Thai Union doesn’t start protecting the oceans and those who work on them, we’ll continue to shut down their supply chains, explains Tom Lowe, who has just returned from the Greenpeace ship the Esperanza’s tour of the Indian Ocean.

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